Results for "nsa"

NSA can restart bulk data collection for 6 months, rules court

NSA can restart bulk data collection for 6 months, rules court

The American Civil Liberties Union is gearing up for a legal battle following a ruling yesterday evening by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court — according to it, the National Security Agency (NSA) can restart its bulk collection of American phone data. The ACLU is planning to challenge the ruling, and will be seeking an injunction against the program via the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Previously this court had ruled that the NSA’s bulk collection program was illegal.

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NSA, GCHQ attacked popular anti-virus software, says leak

NSA, GCHQ attacked popular anti-virus software, says leak

Here's another one for the spy books. To the surprise of perhaps no one, the NSA, along with their British counterparts, the GCHQ, have been revealed to have targeted, hacked, and compromised the very companies whose jobs it was to protect users from hacking and attacks, like, say, from criminals. This is the latest round of scandals coming from the ever-flowing Snowden leaks. Perhaps most worrying is the fact that this so called Project CAMBERDADA targeted not government or corporate security software, but the ones that most of us use on our PCs.

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New rules mean Google won’t get Android Pay transaction fees

New rules mean Google won’t get Android Pay transaction fees

Visa and MasterCard, the two largest payment networks, has established a new standard that practically makes mobile payment transactions free of charge. This is a good news, bad news situation for Google, who just launched its Android Pay late last month. On the one hand, it might mean that merchants will be more willing to embrace the new payment system due to the absence of hidden fees. On the other hand, this means that Google won't have one "feature" that Apple Pay has: a cut for every payment transaction made.

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NSA expanded warrantless internet surveillance in attempt to stop hackers

NSA expanded warrantless internet surveillance in attempt to stop hackers

New documents from Edward Snowden have revealed that since 2012, the US's National Security Agency has had an expanded ability to spy on Americans' internet data and communications, with no need to get a warrant. The documents were published in a New York Times article this week, and reveal that the NSA's goal is to find and stop hackers attempting cyberattacks from outside the country. Until now, this program was never disclosed to the public.

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NSA eyed hijacking connections to Samsung, Google app stores

NSA eyed hijacking connections to Samsung, Google app stores

You have to hand it to the NSA and its allies. It would have moved heaven and earth to be able to spy on anyone and everyone. In the interests of national security, of course. The latest covert plans revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden strikes at the very heart of the Android world. According to leaked documents, the NSA and its counterparts in the "Five Eyes" alliance sought to ride on the traffic that connects smartphones with the likes of Google Play Store, in order to implant spyware on these devices.

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Researchers design new Tor client resistant to NSA attacks

Researchers design new Tor client resistant to NSA attacks

Internet anonymity has become difficult to procure as the NSA is doing everything in its power to keep tabs on Internet activity. One way that people have been protecting their anonymity is by using the anonymizing network, Tor. It was popularly used to access dark web sites like Silk Road, but it can also be used for good. For example, people in certain countries without free speech protections could be jailed or worse for disparaging online claims against the government; Tor provides a way to prevent those users' web activity from being tracked. As it turns out, Tor isn't as safe from the prying eyes of big government surveillance as we once thought.

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House passes USA Freedom Act, curtails NSA’s powers

House passes USA Freedom Act, curtails NSA’s powers

The NSA and other government agencies like it have been dealt yet with another near fatal blow. Just a week after the Court of Appeals agreed with the ACLU that the agency's massive data collection spree was illegal, the House of Representative further reduces the NSA's power. In an almost landslide vote of 338 to 88, the House passed what is known now as the USA Freedom Act of 2015, which imposes limits on what the government can and cannot demand in terms of private phone data.

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Appeals court rules NSA surveillance program illegal

Appeals court rules NSA surveillance program illegal

In March, the ACLU filed a lawsuit against the NSA, claiming their surveillance program was overreaching and illegal. Today, a Federal Court of Appeals has agreed with that assertion, finding the NSA’s practice of data collection “exceeds the scope of what Congress has authorized”. This decision comes well after Edward Snowden began leaking documentation highlighting just how deep and intrusive the NSA’s domestic surveillance program is. In the ruling, Circuit Judge Gerald Lynch wrote “such an expansive concept of 'relevance' is unprecedented and unwarranted”.

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Uber drops service in Kansas, says bill makes operation “impossible”

Uber drops service in Kansas, says bill makes operation “impossible”

Uber pushes and pushes and pushes and sometimes, when all that pushing fails to go the way it wants, it gives in to legal pressure. Such has ended up being the case in Kansas, where the ridesharing service has pointed toward a recent bill as the reason it will be leaving the state, saying it is the only state in the US where Uber has been forced to leave because of “unbalanced, backward regulations.” It suggests, though, that it might be back in the future.

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This is Windows Holographic on HoloLens (and it looks insane)

This is Windows Holographic on HoloLens (and it looks insane)

Microsoft dropped jaws when it revealed HoloLens back in January, but today it showed how Windows Holographic will embed the augmented reality headset into homes, offices, and schools. HoloLens will run universal Windows 10 and project them into the real world around people, whether that be a virtual picture frame on the wall next to a virtual TV screen for video, or even a digital dog. Meanwhile, businesses are already looking at how to bring HoloLens holograms into their workflow.

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