Results for "yotaphone"

YotaPhone 2 first-impressions – Odd E Ink Allure

YotaPhone 2 first-impressions – Odd E Ink Allure

You have to give the team at Yota credit for not giving up on their dual-display smartphone dream. The original YotaPhone was a curious - but flawed - riff on the Android smartphone, a regular screen on one side and an E Ink panel on the back, let down by immature software and hardware. Now, with the YotaPhone 2, the company believes both concept and product are ready for the mass market. I’ve been trying the new smartphone out this week ahead of sales kicking off today, and it’s clear there certainly are advantages over opting for more screens, rather than just bigger ones. Read on for some first-impressions.

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YotaPhone 2 launches, available in Europe this week

YotaPhone 2 launches, available in Europe this week

Russian company Yota has finally taken off the veils from the second generation YotaPhone in two consecutive events in Moscow and London. The YotaPhone 2, one of the brighter stars in this year's CES and MWC expos, gives more class and more power to an already appealing concept. Aside from having a second screen driven entirely by e-ink technology, YotaPhone adds touch to that display, giving users practically two touch screens, switching between the two as the need arises and conserving power along the way.

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YotaPhone 2 dual-screen smartphone launches on December 3

YotaPhone 2 dual-screen smartphone launches on December 3

The YotaPhone 2, shown off earlier this year at MWC 2014, will be making its official launch in a couple of weeks, according to the folks at Android Central. Yota Devices, the company behind the handset, will be having an event in London on December 3 for the second-iteration of the phone we saw back during CES 2013, and though no new details about it are forthcoming at this point, it looks to have the same dual-screen construction.

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Next-Gen YotaPhone offers full touch control on the electronic paper screen

Next-Gen YotaPhone offers full touch control on the electronic paper screen

Lots of new devices are being unveiled today at MWC 2014 in Spain. One of those new devices is the next generation YotaPhone. The original YotaPhone landed last December and brought with it a device with a normal display on one side and an always-on electronic paper display on the other. The idea is that the electronic paper screen will make it easy to read documents while reducing battery consumption.

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YotaPhone double-sided epaper smartphone arrives

YotaPhone double-sided epaper smartphone arrives

The dual-sided YotaPhone, which slaps a 4.3-inch E Ink display on the back of an Android smartphone, has gone on sale, with the ability to switch content between its double screens. Revealed at CES back in January, the YotaPhone is up for order now priced at €499 ($679) in Russia, Austria, France, Spain, and Germany, targeting frequent readers who want to prolong battery life by using the more frugal monochrome epaper panel on the back cover.

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YotaPhone hands-on

YotaPhone hands-on

To be completely honest, the YotaPhone is one of devices I've been most looking forward to seeing during Slashgear's stay here at CES 2013. The device was announced last year and was immediately turning heads with its dual-screen setup. Dual-screen phones are nothing new, but the folks at Yota have put their own little spin on the dual-screen setup: instead of offering two LCD screens, the YotaPhone sports an HD LCD display on the front, and an eInk display around the back.

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The Wearable Medic: GERO and figuring Parkinson’s from Fitbit

The Wearable Medic: GERO and figuring Parkinson’s from Fitbit

There's a suspicion among many that wearable tech is simply today's digital navel-gazing; a self-indulgent and meaningless set of metrics bordering on narcissistic over-obsession. The quantified self could soon become a whole lot more meaningful, however, if startup GERO has its way. Building on groundbreaking research by the Human Locomotome project, the Russian company says it can use the data from wearables like Fitbit's Force and Jawbone's UP to identify chronic conditions such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, depression, and even type 2 diabetes, simply from the way we move. SlashGear caught up with GERO's co-founders at CES as they shift things out of stealth mode.

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