Results for "nustar"

NASA’s NuSTAR takes single massive photo of our sun

NASA’s NuSTAR takes single massive photo of our sun

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR for short, has taken its first photo of our solar system's Sun. This image is the "most sensitive solar portrait ever taken in high-energy X-rays" according to NASA, and you'll be able to view it in full glory right this minute. This first image - of many, hopefully - covers "the west limb of the sun" and it's been caught by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) - and it's primed and ready to be a wallpaper on your device, of course.

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NASA shows off NuSTAR’s complex mirror optics

NASA shows off NuSTAR’s complex mirror optics

NASA is showing off the highly complicated mirror optics of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array known as NuSTAR. That giant barrel shaped gold object is the humongous mirror optics array that will help NuSTAR to be able to see high-energy x-ray in greater detail than ever before. NASA is showing off the optics as the device is set ship out to launch pad in the Pacific Ocean on the Kwajalein Atoll.

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Supermassive black hole’s quasar is fastest ever formed

Supermassive black hole’s quasar is fastest ever formed

Scientists lead by Xue-Bing Wu from Peking University have spotted a quasar that dates back nearly to the beginning of time. This beast goes by the name of SDSSJ010013.021280225.8 - or if you want to be short about it, just SDSS J0100+2802. What makes this monstrous heavenly body so important is its age and its size. While it's not the largest black hole ever detected, it's still 12 billion times our own Sun's mass - and it's sitting in the center of a quasar that's very, very bright.

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Black hole’s bad breath could hamper the heavens

Black hole’s bad breath could hamper the heavens

One supermassive black hole's blasting winds could have major effects on the growth of stars in its host galaxy. NASA and the ESA have both observed winds being blown out of a black hole called PDS 456. Using NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the ESA’s XMM-Newton telescope, scientists like Fiona Harrison of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have been able to begin calculations of the power of this and other black holes in the near future. With great power comes the supreme ability to slow down the speed at which stars age.

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Supermassive black holes’ diets revealed: Crushed stars and X-rays

Supermassive black holes’ diets revealed: Crushed stars and X-rays

The feasting habits of supermassive black holes are under investigation by two teams of astronomers, with X-rays giving up the secrets of three consumed stars, and even how light itself can be bent by the voracious forces. While stars being destroyed by black holes are a rare, once-in-every-10,000-years occurrence, researchers in Russia have identified what they say are three cases. Meanwhile, NASA has been using its own space telescopes to see how X-rays themselves are bent by black holes.

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NASA captures Supernova star secrets on camera

NASA captures Supernova star secrets on camera

NASA has captured the first images of a star's supernova remains, having snapped the burst of radioactive material from the death hundreds of years ago of a star at least eight times larger our own sun. Images from the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) show Cassiopeia A (Cas A), the remains of a huge star, that consists of a "dense stellar corpse" surrounded by the ejected remains. Light from the explosion itself first reached Earth hundreds of years back, NASA says.

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NASA Black Hole search begins today

NASA Black Hole search begins today

If you're a fan of finding gravity wells so strong that science fiction would have them create wormholes into other sides of the universe, NASA has a brand new project you'll find rather interesting. This week the folks at NASA have launched NuSTAR, an array otherwise known as the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, and it aims to fly through space seeking out the Black Hole itself. When it does find said bit of terrifying reality, NASA will study and report on not only this spacecraft's findings on the holes, but their ties to supernova explosions as well.

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