Results for "google europe privacy"

Google must rewrite European privacy policy or face legal sanctions

Google must rewrite European privacy policy or face legal sanctions

Google must change its European privacy policy or run the risk of legal censure, with the UK joining Germany, Italy, France, and Spain in demanding the search giant modify its contentious "unified" policy. The UK's Information Commissioner's Office, the independent privacy watchdog, confirmed this week it had contacted Google giving it until September 20 to rewrite its privacy policy, as currently it "raises serious questions about its compliance with the UK Data Protection Act." If it fails to amend the policy, the ICO warns, Google could find itself the target of "formal enforcement action."

Continue Reading

European regulators tell Google to get its privacy policy issues sorted

European regulators tell Google to get its privacy policy issues sorted

Early last year when Google revealed that it would be combining its privacy policy across all its services, many people cried foul, stating that such a move allowed it to gather far too much information about its users. Google contended that the short, simpler privacy policy is something that users prefer, and that having one policy across multiple products and/or services is not uncommon. European regulators quickly jumped on the change, however, and after some back and forth, they still aren't satisfied with how Google has handled the issue.

Continue Reading

Google faces European privacy policy revolt

Google faces European privacy policy revolt

A European privacy watchdog has demanded Google halt its privacy policy changes, while it looks into "the possible consequences for the protection of the personal data" of users in Europe. The Article 29 Data Protection Working Party requested the delay in a letter to Google [pdf link] this week, claiming that a French data protection authority had agreed to investigate Google's changes. The controversy follows similar concerns in the US, which saw Google execs meet with members of Congress earlier this week for a less-than-satisfactory show and tell session.

Continue Reading

Antitrust lawsuit dismissed against Google’s app bundling

Antitrust lawsuit dismissed against Google’s app bundling

The latest class action antitrust lawsuit against Google has been tabled. The dismissed lawsuit was just one among many to hit Google such as a class action suit about Google Wallet's privacy practices, libel accusations for offending autocomplete suggestions, and copyright infringement for book digitization. The lawsuit in question alleges that Google made illegal contracts with device makers which forced Android OS to use Google's apps as default settings. The suit then further alleges that these backroom deals drove up consumer prices of these smartphones due to restricting competition.

Continue Reading

Google caves to privacy demands after UK investigation

Google caves to privacy demands after UK investigation

Google will change its controversial privacy policy in the UK, acquiescing to regulators who maintain the search giant's attempts to simplify its terms & conditions in fact left them half-baked. The agreement, announced today by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) in the UK, will see Google make changes to how it collects, uses, and communicates user data by June 30, 2015, with more adjustments over the coming two years. It's another pain point in what has been a nearly three year long headache for Google, which revealed its new approach to privacy back in early 2012.

Continue Reading

Bing, Yahoo begin accepting European ‘right to be forgotten’ requests

Bing, Yahoo begin accepting European ‘right to be forgotten’ requests

Good news for individuals in Europe looking to have unwanted information about them purged from internet search results, as Microsoft's Bing and Yahoo's search have officially started accepting and processing "right to be forgotten" requests. This follows a ruling in May by the European Union's Court of Justice that gives people the right to make such requests, and requires search engines to comply under certain circumstances.

Continue Reading

Google should be broken up vote Euro lawmakers

Google should be broken up vote Euro lawmakers

Europe has passed a ruling calling for Google to be broken up, among other things, with politicians concerned that huge, dominant firms like the Silicon Valley giant could end up abusing their position. The vote today at the European Parliament focused on how search functionality should be unbundled from other commercial services, in an effort to reduce the potential of access being abused. While Google wasn't specifically singled out by name, the search giant is nonetheless top of the hit-list given it's responsible for around 90-percent of all queries by European web users.

Continue Reading

Google “right to be forgotten” tool should be global says EU

Google “right to be forgotten” tool should be global says EU

Google's "right to be forgotten" tool was grudgingly implemented in Europe back in May, but now privacy regulators are pushing to scale up the web search censoring system to cover global results, not just those localized to countries in the EU. The ruling - which affects all search engines operating in Europe, though Google is the clear leader with an estimated 90-percent market share there - allows individuals the right to request the removal of links to information "inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant," and at launch saw 12,000 requests in a single day.

Continue Reading

Is Facebook’s privacy update welcome or whitewash?

Is Facebook’s privacy update welcome or whitewash?

Listen to Mark Zuckerberg & Co., and Facebook's privacy changes this week are not only benign but in your very best interest. A pared down explanation on data protection that's ostensibly clearer than before, as well as a guide to exactly what the privacy settings can do, were the sweetener to the side news that Facebook would actually be doing more information sharing, at least between its recent acquisitions like Instagram and WhatsApp. Problem is, we've heard those same explanations before, and they've already got at least one big company into very hot water.

Continue Reading

Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Google was ordered by the Tokyo District Court this week to delete a number of search results that a Japanese man claimed tied him to criminal activity he was not involved in. The decision comes not long after a European court ruled that internet users have the "Right to be Forgotten," forcing Google to accept requests for deleting URLs to misleading or false information from their search results.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6