Results for "google europe privacy"

Google must rewrite European privacy policy or face legal sanctions

Google must rewrite European privacy policy or face legal sanctions

Google must change its European privacy policy or run the risk of legal censure, with the UK joining Germany, Italy, France, and Spain in demanding the search giant modify its contentious "unified" policy. The UK's Information Commissioner's Office, the independent privacy watchdog, confirmed this week it had contacted Google giving it until September 20 to rewrite its privacy policy, as currently it "raises serious questions about its compliance with the UK Data Protection Act." If it fails to amend the policy, the ICO warns, Google could find itself the target of "formal enforcement action."

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European regulators tell Google to get its privacy policy issues sorted

European regulators tell Google to get its privacy policy issues sorted

Early last year when Google revealed that it would be combining its privacy policy across all its services, many people cried foul, stating that such a move allowed it to gather far too much information about its users. Google contended that the short, simpler privacy policy is something that users prefer, and that having one policy across multiple products and/or services is not uncommon. European regulators quickly jumped on the change, however, and after some back and forth, they still aren't satisfied with how Google has handled the issue.

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Google faces European privacy policy revolt

Google faces European privacy policy revolt

A European privacy watchdog has demanded Google halt its privacy policy changes, while it looks into "the possible consequences for the protection of the personal data" of users in Europe. The Article 29 Data Protection Working Party requested the delay in a letter to Google [pdf link] this week, claiming that a French data protection authority had agreed to investigate Google's changes. The controversy follows similar concerns in the US, which saw Google execs meet with members of Congress earlier this week for a less-than-satisfactory show and tell session.

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Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Google was ordered by the Tokyo District Court this week to delete a number of search results that a Japanese man claimed tied him to criminal activity he was not involved in. The decision comes not long after a European court ruled that internet users have the "Right to be Forgotten," forcing Google to accept requests for deleting URLs to misleading or false information from their search results.

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Google releases “Right to be Forgotten” transparency report

Google releases “Right to be Forgotten” transparency report

When Google was made to start accepting and acknowledging URL takedown requests in Europe — the famed “Right to be Forgotten” issue — they were almost immediately inundated with more than they could handle. In the first day alone, Google received over 12,000 requests from netizens, and it doesn’t look to have slowed down much. Yesterday, Google released info about those takedown requests, and the metrics are staggering. In the short time it’s been available, Google has seen over half a million takedown submissions.

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Europe: IM’ing too competitive to deny Facebook’s WhatsApp buy

Europe: IM’ing too competitive to deny Facebook’s WhatsApp buy

Facebook's $19bn acquisition of messaging service WhatsApp has been approved by the European Commission, following US regulators in giving the green light after deciding the deal wouldn't be a threat to consumers. Concerns from some quarters, that the purchase would leave the messaging space unbalanced, were dismissed by competition policy chief Joaquín Almunia, who argued that most users aren't reliant on a single service.

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Google “Right to be Forgotten” tool goes live

Google “Right to be Forgotten” tool goes live

Google has quietly launched a "right to be forgotten" tool which will allow European users to attempt to have personal details they deem outdated or just plain wrong dropped from the search company's index. The new form comes after the ruling by the Court of Justice of the European Union earlier in May, which decided search engines were obliged to concede to such removal requests: however, it's not blanket permission to have anything embarrassing deleted from the internet.

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Google’s Schmidt slates Europe vanity search ruling

Google’s Schmidt slates Europe vanity search ruling

Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt has lashed out at the European Union ruling that individuals have the right to remove themselves from search results, arguing EU "was wrong" in its decision, which has already seen politicians and pedophiles request to be deleted from the search giant's index. "You have a collision between a right to be forgotten and a right to know," Schmidt said during Google's annual stockholder meeting, when asked whether he felt the decision would have an impact on the company's bottom line.

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