Results for "science"

LawBreakers trailer destroys Earth’s moon, fudges science a bit

LawBreakers trailer destroys Earth’s moon, fudges science a bit

In the first trailer for the Boss Key production LawBreakers, this game suggests what might happen were our moon to suddenly explode. They suggest that this explosion was caused by humans - that'd be a feat in and of itself: this massive rock is 3,475 km in diameter and not an easy nut to crack. The moon would require the equivalent of 30 trillion megatons of TNT to destroy - 600 billion nuclear warheads or more. Luckily, "clandestine government testing on the lunar surface" has this covered.

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“L” is for Life Sciences: smart contacts graduate from X Labs

“L” is for Life Sciences: smart contacts graduate from X Labs

Here's another one to add to the Alphabet noodle soup. We've only really heard about Google's plans to put some smarts into contact lenses last year. But according to Google co-founder and now Alphabet president Sergey Brin, they have been hard at work at it for three years under the Google X umbrella. Now, however, with the shuffling of brands and people, the smart contact lens is ready to graduate from experimental status into a new Life Sciences company of its own under the Alphabet mothership.

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Worms defense against plants has big implications for science

Worms defense against plants has big implications for science

A unique compound of chemicals has been discovered in the guts of earthworms in a study on how these creatures break down toxins in soil. This study centered on polyphenols, chemical compounds produced by plants that contain phenol, aka carbolic acid. Soil is polyphenol-rich, meaning earthworms - who eat and process soil - need to cope with a "high-polyphenol diet." They eat toxins, how do they do it? As it turns out, earthworms work with a compound scientists are calling "drilodefensin", able to metabolize these toxins effectively.

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Science detects how mosquitoes always end up biting you

Science detects how mosquitoes always end up biting you

This week a study has been published on the ways and means mosquitoes employ to find their prey - namely you. Instead of just plopping down on whatever land they see, hoping to find some blood inside, the mosquito employs a range of senses to hunt you down and pierce your skin. Mosquitos, researchers suggest this week, use a combination of olfactory, visual, and thermal cues to find your arm, your leg, or your cheek. Whatever they need to do to suck your blood: they're going to do it.

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Watch a chimp drink alcohol for science

Watch a chimp drink alcohol for science

Due to a local human village tapping in to raffia palm trees for their alcohol-rich sap, chimpanzees have found their own way to drink the drink in Bossou. This Guinea, West Africa environment sets the stage for a research paper which suggests that not only are African apes and humans both able to effectively metabolize ethanol, we're both voluntarily doing so now, too. This drinking of the contents of the raffia palm (Raphia hookeri, Arecaceae) by wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) at Bossou in Guinea, West Africa, was observed from 1995 to 2012.

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Science Fiction: Roswell Alien Slides Debunked

Science Fiction: Roswell Alien Slides Debunked

Several sixty-year-old slides, recently claimed by their owner, Adam Dew, to be photos of aliens from Roswell, New Mexico, have been debunked. Just this past week, several people - citizens, UFO "believers" and even some so-called experts in the field - were invited to a New Mexico event to screen a documentary on the slides. As it turns out, the images show no more than the remains of a mummified child. The child currently resides in the Smithsonian in Washington, DC, after having visited San Francisco on temporary loan in the 1940s.

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Samsung Galaxy S6 abused for science

Samsung Galaxy S6 abused for science

We all want to know how well the gadgets that we purchase are going to survive in our daily lives. The last thing we all want is to buy a device for hundreds of dollars that ends up falling apart on us. A YouTube test of the Galaxy S6 has turned up that takes a look at how strong the smartphone is in some very intense bend, scratch, and fire tests.

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Google gave us Cardboard – Facebook gave us a science lesson

Google gave us Cardboard – Facebook gave us a science lesson

This week at F8, Facebook presented a basic plan for the next 10 years in development - both inside and outside the social network. Amongst announcements of flying internet drones and updating the Messenger ecosystem, Facebook officials handed off the mic to Oculus. While we expected that Oculus would give us some indicator of the future of the company - or their involvement with Facebook - instead we got a lesson in the science of virtual reality.

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Liquid metal robots might be more than science fiction soon

Liquid metal robots might be more than science fiction soon

It's as if all the pieces are falling in place to give birth to the SkyNet nightmare that haunts us in the Terminator universe: self-driving cars, a fleet of interconnected Internet-bearing satellites, and now, shape-shifting and self-propelling metal. This last one was a recent discovery of a group of researchers in Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, who stumbled upon a peculiar behavior of a certain mix of metals that, in the end, could change its shape to fit moulds and paths and propel itself forward as well.

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Chameleon color changing abilities unlocked by science

Chameleon color changing abilities unlocked by science

A paper has been published this week in Nature Communications which shows how chameleons are able to swiftly and radically alter their exterior colors. Believe it or not, this study is brand new - science did not know how a creature like the Panther Chameleon was able to change colors based on emotion or surroundings. In addition to uncovering the secrets of miniature nanocrystals for color change, these scientists also uncovered another reason for their existence: passive thermal protection (made to keep cool).

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Animals grow as they evolve: so says science

Animals grow as they evolve: so says science

This week a paper has been published in the journal Science which suggests that the mean size of marine mammals has increased 150-fold in the last 542 million years. It's a massive jump, suggests postdoctoral researcher and co-author of this paper, Noel Heim, suggesting that though it may not seem like a lot when seen between one animal and its closest cousin, it's quite significant. This discovery includes word that increase in body size isn't always due to animal lineages growing bigger, but to the diversification of groups of organisms that are larger, and grow larger than their predecessors early in their line's history.

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Penguins can’t taste ice cream, so says science

Penguins can’t taste ice cream, so says science

All penguins - of all types - have been discovered to have no taste for sweet, bitter, and umami flavors of edible matter. Of course they can't taste anything sweet, even if it happens to be a sweet-tasting rock - but this finding is linked inextricably to eating. As it turns out, its likely penguins lost their taste for several types of food over the course of their migration to cold climates and evolution to the creatures they are today - friendly, tasteless waddlers though they are.

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