Results for "science"

Animals grow as they evolve: so says science

Animals grow as they evolve: so says science

This week a paper has been published in the journal Science which suggests that the mean size of marine mammals has increased 150-fold in the last 542 million years. It's a massive jump, suggests postdoctoral researcher and co-author of this paper, Noel Heim, suggesting that though it may not seem like a lot when seen between one animal and its closest cousin, it's quite significant. This discovery includes word that increase in body size isn't always due to animal lineages growing bigger, but to the diversification of groups of organisms that are larger, and grow larger than their predecessors early in their line's history.

Continue Reading

Penguins can’t taste ice cream, so says science

Penguins can’t taste ice cream, so says science

All penguins - of all types - have been discovered to have no taste for sweet, bitter, and umami flavors of edible matter. Of course they can't taste anything sweet, even if it happens to be a sweet-tasting rock - but this finding is linked inextricably to eating. As it turns out, its likely penguins lost their taste for several types of food over the course of their migration to cold climates and evolution to the creatures they are today - friendly, tasteless waddlers though they are.

Continue Reading

Interstellar’s black hole code leads to real science

Interstellar’s black hole code leads to real science

To achieve the effect of a black hole in the film Interstellar, Christopher Nolan worked with real physicist Kip Thorne to depict scientifically-sound images. Thorne and a team at Double Negative Visual Effects worked to create a new code to solve the equation for visualizing light beams as seen from a viewer as they approach a black hole. This has never been done before. While previous studies have been performed at great distances and with light rays, this system bundled light beams together to create an image that was realistic, beautiful, and scientifically sound.

Continue Reading

Geoengineering not so great, so says Science

Geoengineering not so great, so says Science

Two reports from the Nation Academy of Sciences (NAS) have arrived this week suggesting that so-called "geoengineering" isn't good for the planet. They suggest that the term "geoengineering" isn't a legitimate term, saying instead that the term "Climate Intervention" would be more appropriate. Why, you might ask, do they say that we shouldn't be trying to control the weather? It's simple: we don't yet know the consequences of our actions. Methods for changing our planet's makeup like albedo modification and carbon dioxide removal may still have dire consequences we don't yet understand.

Continue Reading

Rosetta hunt for Philae weighed against science sacrifice

Rosetta hunt for Philae weighed against science sacrifice

The Rosetta comet probe mission may not have gone entirely to plan, but the science is still pouring out - not to mention water from the comet itself - as the ESA considers hunting down the stalled lander. Triumph at getting the Philae lander to the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014 turned to frustration when a less-than-perfect touchdown left the probe short on sunlight and prematurely powered-down. Now, the European Space Agency is considering using the orbiting Rosetta spacecraft to go on a Philae hunt, but there's a price to be paid in potential future research.

Continue Reading

Fizzing apples are now a thing thanks to science

Fizzing apples are now a thing thanks to science

3D printed food. Space-aged whiskey. And now, apples that fizz in your mouth straight from the tree. Such is the marvelous world we live in, where scientists dedicate their brilliance to making things once dreamed of in books. Thanks to Lubera, a Swiss fruit company, you'll soon be able to get your hands on a new variety of apple called the "Paradis Sparkling", which feels like a carbonated juice beverage when eaten. The fruit took years to get perfect, says the makers, who are now selling saplings to interested gardeners.

Continue Reading

WeatherSignal is a first for iOS, uses sensors for science

WeatherSignal is a first for iOS, uses sensors for science

Apple’s door to the walled garden has been left cracked open, and as Developers start to find their way in, things are getting awesome in iOS land. One of the Development teams to meander through the garden is OpenSignal, who have a new app for iPhone 6 and 6 Plus in WeatherSignal. Like the famed (and downright amazing) OpenSignal, WeatherSignal will rely on crowdsourced info to provide real-time, local weather info. The app also represents a first for the iOS platform and Developers alike.

Continue Reading

Oculus talks Gear VR: “Science fiction made real”

Oculus talks Gear VR: “Science fiction made real”

Samsung's Gear VR may have a long and unwieldy official name - the Samsung Gear VR Innovator Edition powered by Oculus - but it's also the result of a lengthy development process, the virtual reality company says. Facebook-owned Oculus and Samsung worked together for a year on the project, with Oculus' John Carmack coming on-stage during Samsung's Unpacked event today to detail the depths the South Korean company gave access to in the Galaxy Note 4 so that the virtual reality HUD would work.

Continue Reading

Science explains why we blow in game cartridges

Science explains why we blow in game cartridges

Your childhood likely involved at least one cartridge-based gaming console, and with those games came a habit that feels as natural as taking up the controller: blowing in the cartridge. It is widely known at this point that such an activity was useless, but that doesn't answer the question of why we did it.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 Next